Sunday, March 24, 2019
MobileTechPinoy

The Nubia Alpha Will Make You Forget About “Foldables” If Only for a Moment

While most of the talk has been around Samsung and Huawei’s newest foldables, the Nubia Alpha is another great showcase of new screen tech that’s making its way to the general consumer. Smartwatches aren’t new, but the Alpha is being touted as a full-fledged smartphone that goes around your wrist. It packs a 960×192 flexible OLED made by Victorinox and can send texts, make calls, and of course, access the internet thanks to eSIM support.

What makes it tick though? Under the hood of the Nubia Alpha is Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Wear 2100 chipset. It also comes with 1GB RAM and 8GB of internal storage, which is enough for roughly 1,000 songs should you load them onto the phone/watch. While designed for wearables, its chipset is actually quite long in the tooth at this point, with a newer Wear 3100 chip that was intended to replace already out since last year. Hopefully, the Alpha’s software is better optimized, because Android Wear was already a bit laggy on the 2100.

Still, the Nubia Alpha is a wearable that should be celebrated. Similar to the foldables that have already come out, it too tries to defy form factors by combining a smartphone and smartwatch into a single device that blurs the lines between both.

Nubia Alpha Specs

DISPLAYTypeAMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size4.0 inches, 19.9 cm2 (~95.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Resolution192 x 960 pixels (~245 ppi density)
Multitouch245 ppi density
PLATFORMOSAndroid Wear 2.1
ChipsetQualcomm MSM8909W Snapdragon Wear 2100
CPUQuad-core 1.1 GHz Cortex-A7
GPUAdreno 304
MEMORYRAM1 GB RAM
ROM8 GB
Expandable?No
CAMERAPrimary5 MP, f/2.2, 25mm (wide)
CONNECTIVITYNetworkHSPA, LTE
WLANWi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth5.0, A2DP, LE
GPSYes, with A-GPS
BATTERYmAhNon-removable Li-Ion 500 mAh battery
MISCSensorsAccelerometer, gyro, heart rate, compass
ColorsGold, Black
BodyStainless Steel
PriceAbout 450 EUR

 

About The Author

Back when I started MobileTechPinoy in 2012, phablets weren't a thing yet. I enjoyed the stares I got from iPhone owners whenever I whipped out my Samsung Galaxy Note at the time. I'm much more budget-conscious these days though and am perfectly fine with using phones from any of our locally brands.